Easter

Your Guide to Easter Flowers

March 15, 2018

When the snow starts to melt and the tops of budding flowers can be found in the dirt, it can only mean one thing — Easter is just around the corner! And that means it’s time to say “goodbye” to the dark colors and hard edges of winter and “hello” to the beautiful soft pastels of spring.

If you’ll be hosting this year’s Easter festivities, there’s no better way to incorporate warm spring colors into your decor than with fresh flowers. That’s why we’re your one-stop-“hop” for all of your Easter flower and decoration needs.

Tulips

Of course, tulips had to be number one on our list. As the flower most associated with spring, tulips fully embody the spirit, colors, and joy of Easter Sunday. Because a tulip’s pastel colors symbolize everything from love and happiness to congratulations, you can never go wrong with a multi-colored bloom of tulips on your dinner table.

Easter Lilies

As a symbol of hope and new life, Easter lilies perfectly embody the sentiments of spring and Easter. And though the name ‘Easter lilies’ was never explicitly written in the bible (as that name wasn’t attributed to the flower until the early 1800s) many believe the large, white lilies described in the Bible as growing rapidly in Palestine, were Easter lilies. And because they’re easy to care for, you can enjoy Easter lilies long after Easter has passed.

Daffodils

Their pattern of blooming during the first few days of Lent isn’t the only association daffodils have with the Easter holiday and Christianity. Legend has it that the world’s first daffodil appeared in the garden of Gethsemane as a way of comforting Jesus just before he was to be crucified.

Easter Cactus

Known for its showstopping, bright red blooms and thick green leaves, Easter cacti are a refreshing change from traditional flowers and perfectly embody both the ending winter and coming spring.

Though it looks remarkably similar to a Christmas cactus, what really separates Easter and Christmas cacti is the time in which each flower blooms. As their names suggest, Easter cacti bloom at the beginning of spring, while Christmas cacti bloom in early winter. Furthermore, Easter cacti last an average of three times longer than their jolly Christmas counterpart.

Daisy

Legend has it that as the Virgin Mary cried for Jesus at his crucifixion, daisies began to sprout from where her tears had fallen. Other stories say that the three wise men knew how to find baby Jesus because the daisies growing around his stable resembled the North Star. This is likely why, in the 15th century, daisies became the symbol for newborn Jesus.

 

Now that you know which flowers will have every-bunny at your table hopping for joy this year, it’s time to incorporate them into even more of your Easter decorations.